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Home > International topics > Cooperation in Human Resource Development > Assistance to Developing Countries > JPO Cooperation in Human Resource Development > Training Programs(short) > Report on the “Training Course on the Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights under the WIPO Funds-in-Trust /JAPAN”

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Report on the “Training Course on the Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights under the WIPO Funds-in-Trust /JAPAN”

From December 1 to December 12, 2014, the "Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights" training course of the WIPO Japan Funds-in-Trust was carried out at APIC, Tokyo. Twenty-four participants from 12 countries in Asia and Africa took part in the course, which was designed for judges and prosecutors who handle intellectual property cases.

Countries of participants:Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam

The training course extended over two weeks. During the first week, lecturers explained the outline of the Japanese intellectual property system, measures against counterfeits and case studies on infringement cases. The Chief Judge of the Intellectual Property High Court also gave a lecture, and the trainees toured the court. The second week started with country reports presented by the trainees. Then, WIPO counselors, judges and university professors lectured on international treaties and the international coordination of judicial proceedings. An intellectual property manager from a global business enterprise in Japan made a presentation on his company's anti-counterfeit measures.

Lecturers from the customs office, police and court respectively talked about the proceedings related to the enforcement of intellectual property rights in Japan. These lectures, as well as case studies of actual infringements that were presented by professors and lawyers, incorporated active discussions between the trainees and lecturers. The course also included a tour of the Intellectual Property High Court. The trainees observed an actual court trial and then received an explanation from a judge about what had been discussed in the trial. The court trial observation attracted the keen interest of the trainees, and they actively asked the judge questions. Many trainees commented that it had been a very useful session.

A full day was assigned to the presentation of country reports. The trainees reported on the current situation regarding the enforcement of intellectual property rights in their respective countries. It was a good opportunity for the trainees to learn about the differences between the various systems and the kinds of infringements occurring in other countries. However, because there were trainees from 12 countries presenting reports, the time allowed for each was perhaps too short, and there was also not enough time for Q&A. Some trainees requested that more time be allotted for this in the future because the session was very useful.

The lectures and discussions during the second week focused on more international aspects of the enforcement of intellectual property rights. Various topics were discussed, including the enforcement of intellectual property rights under the TRIPS Agreement and measures for infringement cases involving more than one country. In particular, the trainees asked many questions during the session discussing measures against IP right infringements in digital environments, such as P2P. Since infringement in this area is a difficult issue to handle, it attracted their keen attention.

On the last day of the training course, an IP manager from a business enterprise possessing IP rights talked about how his company cooperates with enforcement authorities in taking measures against counterfeits and infringements. After the IP manager's presentation, comprehensive discussions took place, with WIPO lecturers also participating. The speaker presented cases where the authorities could enforce IP rights more effectively and efficiently by cooperating with an enterprise that owned IP rights. Many trainees commented that it was a very useful topic.

Previously, this course had targeted judges, prosecutors and officials from the customs office and the police. This year, the course was redesigned as an advanced course for judges and prosecutors only, placing more focus on judicial proceedings.

Generally, favorable comments were received from trainees regarding this narrowing of target. However, some commented that officials from the customs office and other authorities should also take this course, and we must take this feedback into account when reviewing the contents of this course in the future.

Since many trainees seemed to believe that it was important for them to establish a personal network with rights-enforcing authorities of other countries to cope with the globalization of issues related to IP rights enforcement, they were very active in socializing with their peers during the break times and while traveling to the training venues. It is expected that they will leverage the knowledge and the network they have developed through this training session.

Country report presentation

Country report presentation

The trainees at a lecture

The trainees at a lecture

The trainees and lecturers at the closing ceremony

The trainees and lecturers at the closing ceremony

 

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